Understanding a Sample Purchase Conversion Funnel

Looking at examples can provide ideas for designing your own scenarios.

One type of Scenario Analysis is the Purchase Conversion Funnel. The following graphic shows a sample Purchase Conversion Funnel and describes each part of the graph.

The following table explains the callouts in the preceding graphic.

Callout

Description

1

Flow of visitors into the scenario and at which step they entered the scenario

2

Visitors who started their visits at this step

3

Visitors who entered at Step 2

4

Visitors who went directly from Step 3 to Step 4

5

Visitors who abandoned at Step 3

6

Visitors who abandoned the site at this step

7

Detours that led the visitor away from the scenario

8

Movement from step to step

Using the Purchase Conversion Funnel, you can see the flow of visitors into the scenario at the entry points for each step you have defined. The number of visits for each of these entry pages suggests which pages encourage visitors to enter the scenario most effectively.

In this sample Funnel, most visitors enter the scenario at Step 1, accounting for 4,300 visits. Notice that visitors dropped out of the scenario in successively smaller numbers at each step, which is what we want. In Step 1, 2,825 visits dropped out of the scenario; in Step 2, 1,752 visits dropped out of the scenario; and in Step 3, 375 dropped out of the scenario.

The pages on the right side of the Funnel are the detours that visitors took rather than completing the scenario. The top detour pages for Step 2 were the Login Page, Search Results, View Cart, and Support. If this were your actual scenario, you might consider meeting with your web designer and a usability expert to see what you could do to reduce the number of detours.

Look at the End of Visit values on the right side of the Funnel to see the abandonment rate for each step. The End of Visit value for Step 2 was 521 visits. This value tells you that 521 visits fell out of the scenario and abandoned your site at this step. Unless the End of Visit occurs in the last step, this is likely cause for concern.

As a whole, you might be concerned that 58.14% of visitors who started the scenario fell out of the scenario at Step 1. If this were your actual Purchase Conversion Funnel, you'd want to look into Step 1 to see how you could improve the conversion from Step 1 to Step 2.

At the top right, you can click View Step Transitions for an alternate view of the Scenario Funnel as shown in the following graphic:

The following table explains the callouts in the preceding graphic.

Callout

Description

1

Flow of visitors entering each step

2

One visitor who entered directly at Step 2

3

Visitors who went directly from Step 2 to Step 3

4

Visitors who retrace their steps

5

Six visitors who went from Step 1 to Step 3, skipping Step 2

6

The next step visitors went to

7

How visitors started and abandoned the Scenario

This view of the sample Funnel shows that visitors commonly return to the Product Page View, which is typical behavior in a purchase scenario and desirable when they continue to add products to their shopping carts.

In this view, look out for visitors who seem to be confused and retrace their steps in an effort to understand the process your website is asking them to complete. If you identify a step that visitors are repeating when you cannot explain the behavior, make it a priority to find out why.